The Relationship between blood clots and cancer

Certain types of cancers produce cell mediators which increase the stickiness of blood and increase the risk of developing a clot. This increases cancer patients' risk of developing clots. As cancer comes with many unforeseen physical and emotional effects, it can be difficult to navigate symptoms of potential clots and take care of them in the best possible way. The articles below can help.

Blood clots and cancer

What is the link between cancer and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and which cancer types are associated with a higher risk of DVT? Find these answers and more here.
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Additional DVT risk factors

The risk of DVT is associated with cancer, but there are other conditions that could also add to your risk. If you plan to speak to your doctor or oncologist about DVT, it would be good to mention any of the additional risks you may have. Find them here.
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What does blood do?

All of us are familiar with blood but what does it actually do.  If you have been diagnosed with cancer or deep vein thrombosis (DVT), now could be a good time to learn a bit more about its role and how it plays a part in your condition.
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How blood clots go from good to bad

If you have been diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis, you may be hearing the term DVT very often. DVT, an abbreviation for ‘deep vein thrombosis’, is the name of the condition, and many doctors and nurses also refer to the blood clot that causes the condition as a DVT. In this article, you can find out what a common blood clot actually is, how it can begin to cause problems and what distinguishes it from a DVT.
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FAQs: Must know facts about clots

If you already know you are in a high-risk category, you may have lots of questions about blood clots. We’ve compiled a list of FAQs. Here you may find many of the answers you’re looking for, including who gets clots and other risk factors unrelated to cancer.
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Jargon busters for DVT and PE

There is a lot of jargon in the world of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Doctors, nurses and oncologists all have their own vocabulary and many of the terms are interchangeable – making it all seem quite confusing. Arm yourself with knowledge here.
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